• Hope M

    I always think, “Those clothes will never look good on me, because I don’t have that body type.” I can never tell how something will look when it’s on a model. Then they never fit me right if I try to wear it like them.

  • alexm

    Like there’s a reason these women are chosen to be models? Of course designers are going to choose models who show their clothes off to the best advantage. That would be like looking at an olympic gymnast and wondering why you can’t do that. Their job is to look a certain way, and they have been specifically selected to do that. Unless you too are also a model, there’s no reason you should be comparing yourself to them.

    • Faradn

      Models don’t model clothes as entertainment. They do so as ADVERTISMENT–they are literally modeling behavior the clothes companies want their customers to emulate, ie, wearing their clothes. The association between customer and model is obvious.

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      • alexm

        Is that why they call it Fashion ENTERTAINMENT week? That is like saying that the dummies in the store (which are put there as advertisement) are supposed to be modelling behaviour for the customers. We all know we can’t be bright green, plastic and headless, so why do people compare themselves to models? It’s the same thing. They’re there to show the clothes, not be held up as a standard for what people should look like. How about instead of changing what we see, we instead change the unhealthy fixation people seem to have for comparing themselves to others? Sure Barbie has unrealistic body proportions. She’s also a doll made of plastic. So rather than changing that to reflect ‘real’ people, how about we teach people that they don’t have to look like a doll, or a super model, or that famous celebrity/fitness trainer whatever. You look like you, and if your doctor says you’re fit and healthy that should be enough.

        • Faradn

          Right, just refuse to be influenced by media, clear your mind unto perfect non-judgment; find your inner impassive screen-scanning algorithm of enlightened clarity. Sounds like something most humans can do.

          • alexm

            Yep, exactly that. See a picture of a model. Go oh that looks nice, I like that colour/pattern/item of clothing which is the entire point of the model being there. Move on with your life.

          • Stella

            But how will you know if it looks nice for you if you aren’t the same body type as the model?

          • alexm

            Because you can view clothes objectively without associating them with the person wearing them? Obviously you don’t know if they’d look good on you, but that has little to do with body type. No one has the exact same body, and then there are all the other things like colours and height. Not to mention fit and what you’re wearing with it, posture, lighting. You could have two people with the same body type and they aren’t going to look the same in the clothes no matter what.

          • Stella

            Sure, maybe if it’s a type of outfit I’ve worn before and know if it will or will not look good on me. But I’m more apt to know if it will look good if it’s not something I’ve tried before if the person I see it on is similar to me. Not saying she has to be exactly like me, but if she’s got a similar build than I do it makes it much easier/better to judge if I would want to wear that.

          • Christine Taylor

            Are you first two commenters male, Alex and Farad? No offense meant at all – but its time for the men simply listen to the women, and its time for the women to speak out, discuss and find the conclusions to how our image is being used in advertising and all its forms. I am a photographer and creative director – and am myself a product of growing up in the world of the male gaze and I applied that to much of my earlier work. Now, things are changing and so is my own opinion on these matters. I do not always understand/agree – but I am hearing the female voices and finding a new vision of the female gaze that is not based on hypersexualizing often underage girls, and women of all ages. There are many ways to improve our industry and this excites me! Think of all the cool things we can do by breaking free of the box fashion often puts itself into? For a creative professional who loves to solve creatiev problems – this is a divine time to be working! Bring it on! But its my observation that the egoes of a few will only lengthen the time it takes for their business to grow, thus change and profit from these changes. I mean – designers pretty much refuse to design for plus-sizes. Its an entire majority market being looked over cause they just… dont want to design for it. Its wild! So agree or not with the typical industry model size 0-4 (or I have actually seen less), women – the main spenders in fashion – are calling for a shift – a big shift. If we are good at what we do would we not meet this challenge head on? Isnt that the right thing to do? I’m still learning and still shooting small models myself – I’ve never been hired to shoot anything but so far – but saying lets have this dialog, lets listen, lets work together and do what we can do. I think the fantasy of women is just simply – out-of-style. Its passe. We are calling for more real representation and more reality in our lives. We work are asses off. We are leaders. Research proves that we are financial powerhouses and we are the household decision makers. At the end of the day the modern woman works a lot, then goes home and decides where two incomes go for that night, day, month, year. We give the final yes or no on nearly all of the big household spends – and we buy wardrobes that support this lifestyle shift. Research also proves that advertising is largely not working with women consumers. Its a waste. Brands are tossing BIG $ down the drain, designers are folding, and its all cause they are ignoring what women are clearly saying they want to see….. Why fight it? Google 3% if you want more info about this. The fashion world needs to go with the flow and lead the way cause they are falling behind in the changing rolls of women in America.

          • alexm

            ……….Actually a girl. Though probably only just. My original point, which was not meant to start this kind of debate, was that I don’t compare myself to models in any way, because they look the way they do to conform to a specific standard set by their work. Yes, the industry is messed up, I never said it wasn’t. My original comment was my reaction to models in general, not a comment on the industry. Because I wouldn’t compare myself to an olympic athlete either, because I don’t spend several hours a day training and working towards certain performance standards. And similarly, models in magazines currently have to conform to a specific standard and spend many, many hours working towards that. So no, I’m not going to compare myself to someone who has spent a great deal of time and effort working towards that look unless I too was putting in that level of effort.

    • Stella

      But who’s to say that one body type is the only body type that does show off the clothes to the best advantage? Not all women are shaped the same, I’d imagine that showing that your clothes look good on a plethora of different body types would be better in the long run than showing that your clothes only look good on just one body type that only makes up a small percentage of your customers.

      • alexm

        If your purpose is to sell the clothes then sure. I’m not saying diversity in the industry is a bad thing. Just that I personally look at run way models and go ok yes. That is a model. Why on earth would I compare myself to someone who’s entire career revolved around looking like that?

        • Stella

          I personally didn’t say anything about comparing myself to the model, my comment is directed at you saying “Of course designers are going to choose models who show their clothes off to the best advantage”(and the industry itself for making similar claims). My point was why is that model the only body type that supposedly shows off the clothes the best when there’s a multitude of body types out there? Why would I buy something that is only “shown off to its best advantage” on a body type that isn’t mine? This isn’t about comparing myself and feeling I’ve come up lesser somehow, this is about the fact that I’m not tall and thin, so why would I buy something that I am told will only look good on tall and thin(that’s basically what is being said when designers and what not say that tall and thin models are used because they show off the clothes to the best advantage)? I’m more apt to buy clothes that I am shown will look good on someone like me, as I’m sure most other people are.

        • Christine Taylor

          But what about women telling us in the industry – they are tired of having to do this? Is it okay to just ignore that giant voice of millions? Its very – um sexist to do that – and sadly we do live in a world largely experienced through the male point of view. To change this we need to allow women to lead when it comes to ideas and product and marketing to themselves.

      • Christine Taylor

        Yep.